Now all machines at home are on Fedora 15!


I spent 30 minutes this morning upgrading my sons’ laptops to Fedora 15. I used a Fedora 15 LiveDVD (installed on a USB) that I had created that included stuff that the standard Fedora 15 LiveCD does not because of space. Tools like LibreOffice, Scribus, Xournal, Inkscape, Thunderbird, mutt, msmtp, wget, arduino, R, lyx, dia, and filezilla. I’ve thrown in blender and some games into the mix as well.

The updates of the systems went super quick (20 minutes to first boot) and then on to Spot’s Chromium repo:

  1. su –
  2. cd /etc/yum.repos.d/
  3. wget http://repos.fedorapeople.org/repos/spot/chromium/fedora-chromium.repo
  4. yum install chromium

Following that, on to rpmfusion.org to get the free and non-free setup RPMs to get to the tools that are patent encumbered and otherwise forbidden to be included in a standard Fedora distribution.

  1. yum install http://download1.rpmfusion.org/free/fedora/rpmfusion-free-release-stable.noarch.rpm
  2. yum install http://download1.rpmfusion.org/nonfree/fedora/rpmfusion-nonfree-release-stable.noarch.rpm
  3. yum install vlc
  4. yum install thunderbird-enigmail

[Update, June 19, 2011 0050 SGT] Based on the comment from Jeremy to this post, I’m updating the instructions]

The last bit is flash from Adobe – the 64-bit version:

  1. wget http://download.macromedia.com/pub/labs/flashplayer10/flashplayer10_2_p3_64bit_linux_111710.tar.gz.
  2. tar xvfz flashplayer10_2_p3_64bit_linux_111710.tar.gz
  3. cp libflashplayer.so /usr/lib64/mozilla/plugins/
  4. chmod +x /usr/lib64/mozilla/plugins/libflashplayer.so

Installing a 32-bit version of Adobe Flash for a 64-bit Fedora installation:

  1. Go to http://fedoraproject.org/wiki/Flash#Enabling_Flash_plugin
  2. Installing a 32-bit wrapped into a 64-bit version
  3. ln -s /usr/lib64/mozilla/plugins-wrapped/nswrapper_32_64.libflashplayer.so /usr/lib64/chromium-browser/plugins
  4. These steps should be sufficient for flash to be enabled for both Firefox and Chromium

Once done, restart your browser and you will have flash enabled.

Yes, I am aware that I’ve had to compromise and load up non-free software. It is less than ideal and I am looking forward to GNU Flash maturing as well as MP3 and related codec getting out of patent.

4 thoughts on “Now all machines at home are on Fedora 15!

  1. Harish,

    Gnash seems only suitable for objects with ActionScript 2 and below. Most flash ads actually work for my Gnash installation. Lightspark seems to be doing quite an excellent job by following specs released by Adobe under the Open Screen Project. For my build on Ubuntu 10.04, I have gotten sound working though video is garbled. The developers report that it works perfectly for Youtube and Vimeo under 10.10 and later. Luckily Lightspark does a graceful fallback to Gnash when it fails.

    Still Alpha quality nonetheless but quite a good hack which needs more financial support. Now – only if they can tie up with the FSF and get some funding. Meanwhile, its tinyogg.com for me!

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