A better model to work with citizens


I have been putting off installing the SGSecure application on my phone.

I finally decided to do it via the Google Playstore. It got downloaded and installed and when I started the app, it needed me to agree to the Terms of Use:

Screenshot_20170407-084036

I know most people would just hit the “I agree” button, but not me.

I hit the “Terms of Use” link and it then brought me to Ts&Cs page.

Screenshot_20170407-083728

As an open source advocate, I am very disappointed that a tax-dollars funded application is kept proprietary. I am OK for the contents the app works with as “proprietary”, but at the very least, I expect that the application code be placed on an open source license like the GNU General Public License. Why? So that we can all work to make it even better. The government is not the best in building applications and as has been demonstrated over the last few years, working with the free and open source community helps build a significantly better application no matter who you are.

Continuing the Ts&Cs:

Screenshot_20170407-083746

Screenshot_20170407-083805

I have a problem with 4 (b) above. Why would the app need access to messaging services? Shouldn’t the app be able to send information to the relevant recipients directly?

Screenshot_20170407-083932

What’s with 4 (e) where it says that PII may be shared with non-Government services? It is easy to say “to serve you better”. I would want to know who the non-G service providers are and how they manage these PII.

Screenshot_20170407-084001

The link at the bottom of the screenshot above, brings me to https://e3res.sgsecure.sg/misc/tnc_v1.html – a substantially similar one as the one included in the app.

I decided to uninstall it.  And I tweeted about my hesitation in accepting this app. Hopefully someone is listening and I am more than willing to discuss.

This is quite a nice tool – magic-wormhole


I was catching up on the various talks at PyCon 2016 held in the wonderful city of Portland, Oregon last month.

There are lots of good content available from PyCon 2016 on youtube. What I was particularly struck was, what one could say is a mundane tool for file transfer.

This tool, called magic-wormhole, allows for any two systems, anywhere to be able to send files (via a intermediary), fully encrypted and secured.

This beats doing a scp from system to system, especially if the receiving system is behind a NAT and/or firewall.

I manage lots of systems for myself as well as part of the work I at Red Hat. Over the years, I’ve managed a good workflow when I need to send files around but all of it involved having to use some of the techniques like using http, or using scp and even miredo.

But to me, magic-wormhole is easy enough to set up, uses webrtc and encryption, that I think deserves to get a much higher profile and wider use.

On the Fedora 24 systems I have, I had to ensure that the following were all set up and installed (assuming you already have gcc installed):

a) dnf install libffi-devel python-devel redhat-rpm-config

b) pip install –upgrade pip

c) pip install magic-wormhole

That’s it.

Now I would want to run a server to provide the intermediary function instead of depending on the goodwill of Brian Warner.

 

UEFI and Fedora/RHEL – trivially working.


My older son just enrolled into my alma mater, Singapore Polytechnic, to do Electrical Engineering.  It is really nice to see that he has an interest in that field and, yes, make me smile as well.

So, as part of the preparations for the new program, the school does need the use of software as part of the curriculum. Fortunately, to get a computer was not an issue per se, but what bothered me was that the school “is only familiar with windows” and so that applications needed are also meant to run on windows.

One issue led to another and eventually, we decided to get a new laptop for his work in school. Sadly, the computer comes only with windows 8.1 installed and nothing else. The machine has ample disk space (1TB) and the system was set up with two partitions – one for the windows stuff (about 250G) and the 2nd partition as the “D: drive”. Have not seen that in years.

I wanted to make the machine dual bootable and went about planning to repartition the 2nd partition into two and have about 350G allocated to running Fedora.

Then I hit an issue.  The machine was installed with Windows using the UEFI. While the UEFI has some good traits, but unfortunately, it does throw off those who want to install it with another OS – ie to do dual-boot.

Fortunately, Fedora (and RHEL) can be installed into a UEFI enabled system. This was taken care of by work done by Matthew Garrett as part of the Fedora project. Matthew also received the FSF Award for the Advancement of Free Software earlier this year. It could be argued that perhaps UEFI is not something that should be supported, but then again, as long as systems continue to be shipped with it, the free software world has to find a way to continue to work.

The details around UEFI and Fedora (and RHEL) is all documented in Fedora Secure Boot pages.

Now on to describing how to install Fedora/RHEL into a UEFI-enabled system:

a) If you have not already done so, download the Fedora (and RHEL) ISOs from their respective pages. Fedora is available at https://fedoraproject.org/en/get-fedora and RHEL 7 Release Candidate is at ftp://ftp.redhat.com/pub/redhat/rhel/rc/7/.

b) With the ISOs downloaded, if you are running a Linux system, you can use the following command to create a bootable live USB drive with the ISO:

dd  if=Fedora-Live-Desktop-x86_64-20-1.iso of=/dev/sdb

assuming that /dev/sdb is where the USB drive is plugged into. The most interesting thing about the ISOs from Fedora and RHEL is that they are already set up to boot into a UEFI enabled system, i.e., no need to disable in BIOS the secure boot mode.

c) Boot up the target computer via the USB drive.

d) In the case of my son’s laptop, I had to repartition the “D: drive” and so after boot up from the USB device, I did the following:

i) (in Fedora live session): download and install gparted (sudo yum install gparted) within the live boot session.

ii) start gparted and resize the “D: drive” partition. In my case, it was broken into 2 partitions with about 300G for the new “D: drive” and the rest for Fedora.

e) Once the repartitioning is done, go ahead and choose the “Install to drive” option and follow the screen prompts.

Once the installation is done, you can safely reboot the machine.

You will be presented with a boot menu to choose the OS to start.

QED.

 

I know more than you do


I cannot help but continue to be baffled by the way the G responds to some of the continuing challenges that the nation faces.

Way back in 2009, the Ministry of Home Affairs announced the formation of the Singapore Infocomm Technology Security Authority. It apparently is an entity within the Internal Security Department. Fast forward four years, the Ministry of Defence announces the setting up of a Cyber Defence Operations Hub. Not sure how much these two efforts are costing us, the tax payer, but suffice to say, an extra $130 million will apparently be spent on more cyber security stuff over the next 5 years. Nice.

Money is not an object is seems. There is plenty to be spent. Will any of this help create new software and hardware that is open? Will the tax dollars being spent enable the citizens to help and innovate upon? I suspect that they will not buy the “security by obscurity” meme and claim national security being paramount and so all things have to be hidden.

While all of this was happening, some websites got defaced. Defaced by groups who label themselves as “Messiah” and claiming affiliations with the Anonymous group. The clueless mainstream media, obviously, go about saying that the sites were “hacked”. Hacking is a noble thing. It is a skill, a frame of mind, a can do bravado. A cracker/vandal, on the other hand, is one who does not live up to the hacker ideals and ethics and abuses her skills. She is no different from a housebreaker who by day is a locksmith.

So, amidst all of these defacements and “cyberwar” preparedness, we get reports of some individuals being caught and the charged in court for allegedly undertaking the defacements. These alleged vandals, if we are to go by the MSM reports, seem to be nothing more than script-kiddies who could not even do the basic “cover your tracks” that any criminal worth his salt would have done. These script-kiddies merely locked on to pre-existing flaws in the sites they chose to vandalize and did the deed. Perhaps they deserve the book being thrown at them.

On the other hand, these alleged vandals could be fall guys. They were unskilled enough to have been caught.

This is too cool!


[harish@phoenix ~]$ traceroute 216.81.59.173
traceroute to 216.81.59.173 (216.81.59.173), 30 hops max, 60 byte packets
 1 registerlafonera.fon.com (192.168.10.1) 2.473 ms 2.937 ms 3.902 ms
 2 cm1.zeta224.maxonline.com.sg (116.87.224.1) 15.342 ms 15.664 ms 16.515 ms
 3 172.20.53.17 (172.20.53.17) 17.175 ms 17.540 ms 18.104 ms
 4 172.26.53.1 (172.26.53.1) 18.865 ms 20.381 ms 20.813 ms
 5 172.20.7.30 (172.20.7.30) 24.398 ms 24.337 ms 24.227 ms
 6 203.117.35.45 (203.117.35.45) 28.237 ms 17.013 ms 16.335 ms
 7 203.117.34.37 (203.117.34.37) 15.227 ms 21.645 ms 21.858 ms
 8 203.117.34.198 (203.117.34.198) 20.962 ms 21.042 ms 20.766 ms
 9 203.117.36.38 (203.117.36.38) 21.584 ms 22.500 ms 22.639 ms
10 paix.he.net (198.32.176.20) 213.814 ms 214.532 ms 216.222 ms
11 10gigabitethernet9-3.core1.sjc2.he.net (72.52.92.70) 209.283 ms 209.811 ms 206.368 ms
12 10gigabitethernet5-3.core1.lax2.he.net (184.105.213.5) 197.110 ms 199.926 ms 203.206 ms
13 10gigabitethernet2-3.core1.phx2.he.net (184.105.222.85) 231.479 ms 234.769 ms 234.712 ms
14 10gigabitethernet5-3.core1.dal1.he.net (184.105.222.78) 246.268 ms 246.252 ms 246.026 ms
15 10gigabitethernet5-4.core1.atl1.he.net (184.105.213.114) 273.176 ms 273.562 ms 273.933 ms
16 216.66.0.26 (216.66.0.26) 257.073 ms 257.860 ms 258.197 ms
17 * * *
18 Episode.IV (206.214.251.1) 279.888 ms 277.874 ms 280.236 ms
19 A.NEW.HOPE (206.214.251.6) 285.736 ms 284.384 ms 285.730 ms
20 It.is.a.period.of.civil.war (206.214.251.9) 291.342 ms 293.745 ms 293.975 ms
21 Rebel.spaceships (206.214.251.14) 295.027 ms 300.389 ms 300.605 ms
22 striking.from.a.hidden.base (206.214.251.17) 300.050 ms 300.106 ms 299.865 ms
23 have.won.their.first.victory (206.214.251.22) 284.885 ms 291.515 ms 293.083 ms
24 against.the.evil.Galactic.Empire (206.214.251.25) 282.759 ms 280.749 ms 280.269 ms
25 During.the.battle (206.214.251.30) 301.951 ms 300.714 ms 297.183 ms
26 Rebel.spies.managed (206.214.251.33) 306.370 ms * *
27 * to.steal.secret.plans (206.214.251.38) 304.887 ms 301.879 ms
28 to.the.Empires.ultimate.weapon (206.214.251.41) 292.549 ms 290.469 ms 291.832 ms
29 the.DEATH.STAR (206.214.251.46) 290.021 ms 281.892 ms 280.153 ms
30 an.armored.space.station (206.214.251.49) 283.677 ms 295.996 ms 285.008 ms
[harish@phoenix ~]$

Good stuff, Episode IV.

In a word, wow!


I am not sure if this is a report that contains stuff taken out of context, but if its true that PM Lee thinks that his government did not have clarity in vision, what does that mean to all the justifications of paying sky-high wages to the “ministers” who were, after all, the ones who should have looked out for us?

I await back-peddling and clarifications before commenting on what appears to me an admission of failure.

While we are talking about failures, let me point a huge failure playing out in the Singapore civil service in the form of the fiasco called the  “Standard Operating Environment”. There is no one in the civil service that has anything positive to say about the fiasco that they have to be living with for the next umpteen years. The amount of tax dollars wasted and continued to be wasted because of the closed, proprietary software chosen is appalling. We need to stop it. Now!

Mr Prime Minister, I made an offer to help set up a Singapore Open Institute that will propel the Singapore public sector rapidly forward with the adoption and use of open source software and make it innovative and forward thinking. The offer still has not been taken up by you or your office.

Let’s make rapid changes and changes for the better. I look forward to hearing from you at h dot pillay at ieee dot org.