Three must haves in Fedora 26


I’ve been using Fedora ever since it came out back in 2003. The developers of Fedora and the greater community of contributors have been doing a amazing job in incorporating features and functionality that subsequently has found its way into the downstream Red Hat Enterprise Linux distributions.

There are lots to cheer Fedora for. GNOME, NetworkManager, systemd and SELinux just to name a few.

Of all the cool stuff, I particularly like to call out three must haves.

a) Pomodoro – A GNOME extension that I use to ensure that I get the right amount of time breaks from the keyboard. I think it is a simple enough application that it has to be a must-have for all. Yes, it can be annoying that Pomodoro might prompt you to stop when you are in the middle of something, but you have the option to delay it until you are done. I think this type of help goes a long way in managing the well-being of all of us who are at our keyboards for hours.

b) Show IP: I really like this GNOME extension for it does give me at a glance any of a long list of IPs that my system might have. This screenshot shows ten different network end points and the IP number at the top is that of the Public IP of the laptop. While I can certainly use the command “ifconfig”, while I am on the desktop, it is nice to have it needed info tight on the screen.

 

 

c) usbguard: My current laptop has three USB ports and one SD card reader. When it is docked, the docking station has a bunch more of USB ports. The challenge with USB ports is that they are generally completely open ports that one can essentially insert any USB device and expect the system to act on it. While that is a convenience, the possibility of abuse isincreasing given rogue USB devices such as USB Killer, it is probably a better idea to deny, by default, all USB devices that are plugged into the machine. Fortunately, since 2007, the Linux kernel has had the ability to authorise USB devices on a device by device basis and the tool, usbguard, allows you to do it via the command line or via a GUI – usbguard-applet-qt. All in, I think this is another must-have for all users. It should be set up with default deny and the UI should be installed by default as well. I hope Fedora 27 onwards would be doing that.

So, thank you Fedora developers and contributors.

 

 

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UEFI and Fedora/RHEL – trivially working.


My older son just enrolled into my alma mater, Singapore Polytechnic, to do Electrical Engineering.  It is really nice to see that he has an interest in that field and, yes, make me smile as well.

So, as part of the preparations for the new program, the school does need the use of software as part of the curriculum. Fortunately, to get a computer was not an issue per se, but what bothered me was that the school “is only familiar with windows” and so that applications needed are also meant to run on windows.

One issue led to another and eventually, we decided to get a new laptop for his work in school. Sadly, the computer comes only with windows 8.1 installed and nothing else. The machine has ample disk space (1TB) and the system was set up with two partitions – one for the windows stuff (about 250G) and the 2nd partition as the “D: drive”. Have not seen that in years.

I wanted to make the machine dual bootable and went about planning to repartition the 2nd partition into two and have about 350G allocated to running Fedora.

Then I hit an issue.  The machine was installed with Windows using the UEFI. While the UEFI has some good traits, but unfortunately, it does throw off those who want to install it with another OS – ie to do dual-boot.

Fortunately, Fedora (and RHEL) can be installed into a UEFI enabled system. This was taken care of by work done by Matthew Garrett as part of the Fedora project. Matthew also received the FSF Award for the Advancement of Free Software earlier this year. It could be argued that perhaps UEFI is not something that should be supported, but then again, as long as systems continue to be shipped with it, the free software world has to find a way to continue to work.

The details around UEFI and Fedora (and RHEL) is all documented in Fedora Secure Boot pages.

Now on to describing how to install Fedora/RHEL into a UEFI-enabled system:

a) If you have not already done so, download the Fedora (and RHEL) ISOs from their respective pages. Fedora is available at https://fedoraproject.org/en/get-fedora and RHEL 7 Release Candidate is at ftp://ftp.redhat.com/pub/redhat/rhel/rc/7/.

b) With the ISOs downloaded, if you are running a Linux system, you can use the following command to create a bootable live USB drive with the ISO:

dd  if=Fedora-Live-Desktop-x86_64-20-1.iso of=/dev/sdb

assuming that /dev/sdb is where the USB drive is plugged into. The most interesting thing about the ISOs from Fedora and RHEL is that they are already set up to boot into a UEFI enabled system, i.e., no need to disable in BIOS the secure boot mode.

c) Boot up the target computer via the USB drive.

d) In the case of my son’s laptop, I had to repartition the “D: drive” and so after boot up from the USB device, I did the following:

i) (in Fedora live session): download and install gparted (sudo yum install gparted) within the live boot session.

ii) start gparted and resize the “D: drive” partition. In my case, it was broken into 2 partitions with about 300G for the new “D: drive” and the rest for Fedora.

e) Once the repartitioning is done, go ahead and choose the “Install to drive” option and follow the screen prompts.

Once the installation is done, you can safely reboot the machine.

You will be presented with a boot menu to choose the OS to start.

QED.

 

Being part of Community Architecture


It is time to tell the world that I have the distinct pleasure to become part of the Community Architecture team within Red Hat. This is indeed both an exciting as well as a deeply challenging opportunity.  Exciting because it means I get to continue to engage with some of the brightest minds within Red Hat who are chartered to think about how the FOSS community has to be kept alive and well. A thriving FOSS community will help continue the amazingly rapid innovation that happens which Red Hat can then bring to enterprises.  Red Hat bringing the innovations from the community to enterprises ensures that everyone wins by added engineering and QA/QE that is added so that deploying FOSS in mission critical systems become a no-brainer. Equally important, the investments by Red Hat on the additional QA/QE flows back out to the FOSS community.  All of this is the core of what has come to be termed, The Open Source Way.

I have a lot of ideas as does the team. We need to build a thriving community of FOSS contributors in Asia Pacific (APAC in short).  For too long, APAC has been a net consumer of FOSS and contributors are few and far between.  I am hoping that with the added focus I now can bring to this space on a full-time basis, that the number of people contributing code, documentation, testing, new ideas etc from APAC countries will see an increase. It has always been my belief that smart people are evenly distributed around the world.  Why we see pockets of contributors is largely a function of connectivity and opportunity.  With the connectivity equation becoming moot, we need to foster opportunity.  For that, I am gung ho and ready to make the plunge.
My initial target group will be the Fedora, JBoss and DeltaCloud communities. Onward ho!

Rescuing a SCO OpenServer 5.0.5 machine to run in a VM on RHEL5.4


I received a frantic SMS from an old classmate running a travel agency business saying that his SCO machine cannot now boot. He is running an application written to a 3-GL/4-GL product called Thoroughbred. He has had the system running since about 1999. And since it does not connect to the Internet, and only has internal LAN users coming in via a telnet connection, he never needed to keep it updated.

So, what was the problem? His 10-year old IBM tower machine failed to boot. Got some help from a local vendor and found that it was the power supply that failed not the harddisk. WIth the power supply replaced, he is now back in business. The proposal given to him from the vendor who fixed the hardware was to “upgrade to a new machine, but we cannot guarantee that the OS and applications you have running will work”.

Enter, the lunch meeting. After hearing his story, I thought his situation would make for an interesting case study for virtualization. So, with his permission, I got hold of the “still in original shrink-warp” SCO manuals and CDs along with the Thoroughbred software and installed the SCO OpenServer 5.0.5 in a RHEL 5.4 VM.

Here is what I had to do:
a) dd’ed the SCO OpenServer 5.0.5 CD (“you can now boot from the CD if your BIOS supports it”) into an iso. It came up to about 280M only!
b) From virtual-machine-manager, choose a new maching with full virtualization
c) Specified 800MB as the drive size (imagine that!)
d) Kept the defaults for the rest.
e) Proceeded with the boot up and installation.
f) All went well. It is hilarious to see the setting up of the harddisk with the sector numbers and heads being cycled through – the “drive” is virtual, and kudos to the virtualization engineers, the SCO installation program was sufficiently convinced that it was all real.
g) Boot up.

The boot up went well (user: root and password: fedora). But the network was not working. Had to start “scoadmin” to get into a curses based setup to configure the network device. I had to go back to virtual-machine-manager and set this VM to have a “pcnet” network. The default “hypervisor” network did not seem to work. The “pcnet” is apparently a ISA device which the SCO has drivers for. It was in the AMD section of the hardware network hardware setup section of the scoadmin command.

So here’s the /etc/libvirt/qemu/sco-openserver-5.0.5.xml:

  sco-openserver-5.0.5
  447d29e3-7891-bb76-385c-82d38e43e739
  524288
  524288
  1

    hvm

  destroy
  restart
  restart

    /usr/bin/qemu

[BTW, in the xml file above, I have to add a space after the < above so that it will not be interpereted by lj. Edit out the extra space if you want to use the xml file.]

The SCO OpenServer 5.0.5 does not have DHCP default and needs an IP to be specified. So, an IP, netmask and default gw has to be specified manually. Interestingly, the network device is “net3”.

It could ping out of the box, telnet to external machines etc so the NAT setup of the VM is working fine.

Looks like I have solved the problem from my friend by using virtualization. Now can get go get a new machine and run RHEL 5.4 on it have his ancient SCO OpenServer 5.0.5 + applications run in perpetuity.

Minor issue with NetworkManager and Fedora 12


Just solved a problem on my Fedora 12 32-bit machine (Acer Aspire One D250). For some reason, the nm-applet is not starting when I log into the desktop. When I start a terminal and fire up nm-applet as a normal user, I get the following error:

[user@machine ~]$ nm-applet

** (nm-applet:7050): WARNING **:  request_name(): Could not
 acquire the NetworkManagerUserSettings service.
  Error: (9) Connection  ":1.372" is not allowed to own the service 
"org.freedesktop.NetworkManagerUserSettings" due to security policies
in the confuguration file

But, when I substitute user as root (su -), I can start it and all’s well. Not a happy situation.

Did some checking and got a hint from – http://bbs.archlinux.org/viewtopic.php?id=63576.

So, what I have done is the following. In etc/dbus-1/system.d/nm-applet.conf, I had to add the
following for my userid:

    
        
        
        

        
    

I am using the “user” setting and not a group as suggested in the URL above as I do not want to create a non-standard group for this purpose. Suffice that my immediate problem is solved.

On the Fedora 12 machine that is experiencing this issue, policykit is as follows:

$ rpm -qa|grep polkit
polkit-0.95-0.git20090913.6.fc12.i686
polkit-gnome-0.95-0.git20090913.3.fc12.i686
polkit-desktop-policy-0.95-0.git20090913.3.fc12.noarch

On another Fedora 12 machine that all’s well policykit is as follows:

$ rpm -qa|grep polkit
polkit-0.95-0.git20090913.3.fc12.i686
polkit-gnome-0.95-0.git20090913.6.fc12.i686
polkit-desktop-policy-0.95-0.git20090913.3.fc12.noarch

Posted this to BZ 549253.

Automatically connecting to the Wireless@SG hotspots


Thanks to a caustic comment some years ago to Lee Kuan Yew by some visitors to Singapore, we have a nation-wide free wifi network called “Wireless@SG”. It has been a constant pain to use and after much ridicule, someone, somewhere has decided to do the Right Thing (TM).

So, what was the problem? Well, when you come across a Wireless@SG hotspot, you have to log in via a browser before you can continue. Yes, you have to provide a username and password (yes, “someone” wants to track you). Move away from that hotspot to another Wireless@SG node, you have to log in again. No mobility. Wireless is about mobility. The people at IDA claim that they are constrained by “security requirements” from the Ministry of Home Affairs. On the other hand, the MHA folks I spoke with say otherwise. So, who dropped the ball? Whatever it is, we have wasted a tonne of tax-payer monies to run the Wireless@SG system for the last few years. There has not been a single report of the service levels of Wireless@SG and how IDA is accounting for the monies spent. I have no issue with providing a quality service using tax dollars. But to provide something that is annoying to use and having no public accountability is plain wrong.

Wireless@SG is still there and there appears to be some people using it. Most of them are NOT mobile – they tend to be seated at some fast food restaurant or coffee place etc.

Now, fast forward to 2010, it looks like the IDA has finally gotten around to make the Wireless@SG truly mobile. Why it took years, I cannot answer. Perhaps some boardroom battles had to be fought, who knows! Someone want to snitch? Post it anonymously if you must.

OK, so we now have proper mobility. Let’s look at the site that discusses this.

First, it suggests that you go to http://www.infocomm123.sg/wireless_at_sg/ssa#connect and gives you two options to connect – one via a piece of software (closed source) to connect your devices. Interestingly, they only list:

Supported Operating Systems
	- iPhone
	- Windows Mobile 6.1 and above
	- Windows XP/Vista/7
	- Mac OS 10.5 and above

as the supported OSes. No Fedora? Why?

Nevermind that. Let’s look at the 2nd option – the manual way of doing this.

Supported Operating Systems
	- iPhone
	- Windows Mobile 6.1 and above
	- Symbian S60 Windows XP/Vista/7
	- Mac OS 10.4 and above 
	- Blackberry OS 
	- Android 1.6 and above

again, no Fedora? They have Android so, how difficult is it to enable Fedora on it?

OK, let’s explore further. I had an account with iCellWireless and choosing thier column entry on Android, I get to see Android configuration document.

The information is trivial. This is all you need to do:

	- Network SSID: Wireless@SGx
	- Security: WPA Enterprise
	- EAP Type: PEAP
	- Sub Type: PEAPv0/MSCHAPv2

and then put in your Wireless@SG username@domain and password. I could not remember my iCell id (I have not used it for a long time) so I created a new one – sgatwireless@icellwireless.net. They needed me to provide my cellphone number to SMS the password. Why do they not provide a web site to retrieve the password?

Now from the info above, you can set this up on a Fedora machine (would be the same for Red Hat Enterprise Linux, Ubuntu, SuSE etc) as well as any other modern operating system.

Now that we have solved the single sign on problem with Wireless@SG, I want statistics on usage, support problems, etc etc etc.

Fonera 2.0n finally!


Finally vpost delivers the Fonera 2.0n I ordered online. Earlier this week, I was suprised to receive a letter (yes, paper mail) from SingPost that my Fon was being held at Singapore Customs pending approval to import from IDA. The letter had the names of the IDA folks to contact. I sent them an email and they came back promptly that they are OK with the device. I sent a PDFed copy of the letter to the IDA officer, who printed it out, stamped it saying that there are no objections, and PDFed it back. Thankfully I had cc’ed SingPost during all the correspondance, and viola, I get an email from SingPost that the delivery will be sent to my house. Wow! All done by email, PDFs and with litterally zero hassle. I do hope that SingPost would be able to check with IDA on these devices beforehand to see if there are any issues before going through the paces, but, as in any good story, the ending is happy.

Now I am a happy owner of a brand new Fonera 2.0n and I can now deploy at home. Welcome, 2010!

Xournal


Thanks to Xournal, you can now annotate any PDF and export it out to a new PDF. This is excellent for filling in forms, note taking, keeping a journal, writing using a stylus etc. I have just experimented it on my newly minted Fedora 12 machine and it just worked wonderfully. My set up has a Genius G-Pen 340 pen tablet plugged in via a USB port and it just all worked seamlessly. Kudos to all who make this happen!

Brother DCP-135C and Fedora 12


I was disappointed that the Brother DCP-135C is not within the CUPS database. However, kudos to Brother, they do make drivers available on their website.

I have the USB version of the printer/scanner/fax machine and I had to download the drivers from DCP-135C. Pick the 32-bit or 64-bit rpms as needed.

What I did was to download the LPR, cupswrapper drivers, then went to scanner section and downloaded the brscan2 and scan-key-tool rpms.

With the 4 rpms downloaded, I switched to a terminal and:

yum install brscan2-0.2.5-1.i386.rpm brscan-skey-0.2.1-3.i386.rpm \
  dcp135ccupswrapper-1.0.1-1.i386.rpm dcp135clpr-1.0.1-1.i386.rpm --nogpgcheck

I hope Brother will set up a proper repo so that these can be done automatically!

Temporary fix to run Chromium in Fedora 12


Filed in BZ: https://bugzilla.redhat.com/show_bug.cgi?id=550651

Just updated Chromium via Spot’s page using yum update for Fedora 12. SELinux permission issues on three libraries. Need to grant permission to SELinux to run the following:

#!/bin/sh
chcon -t textrel_shlib_t '/usr/lib/chromium-browser/libmedia.so' 
chcon -t textrel_shlib_t '/usr/lib/chromium-browser/libnacl.so' 
chcon -t textrel_shlib_t '/usr/lib/chromium-browser/libsandbox.so'
#to make the change permanent 
semanage fcontext -a -t textrel_shlib_t '/usr/lib/chromium-browser/libmedia.so' 
semanage fcontext -a -t textrel_shlib_t '/usr/lib/chromium-browser/libnacl.so' 
semanage fcontext -a -t textrel_shlib_t '/usr/lib/chromium-browser/libsandbox.so'
#

Put those 6 lines above in a script, run it and chromium should work there after.

BTW, Chromium was from:

[chromium]
name=Chromium Test Packages
baseurl=http://spot.fedorapeople.org/chromium/F$releasever/
enabled=1
gpgcheck=0

Digital Restrictions Mismanagement or in Microsoft-speak RMS Restriction Mismgt System


Why would anyone continue to put any more credibility with the entire Digital Restrictions (mis)Management that our Redmond friends continue to implement in their software? DRM is bad enough, being locked out of your own files is completely unacceptable. Does this warrant a class action suit? I don’t know for I am a happy user of OpenOffice.org which does not have any of these abominations.

I like the following comment on /.. I think it is 100% spot on.

Deviant Linux? Normal Microsoft computer?


This was on a mailing list and thought I should publish it here for posterity.

(Tech Support | California, USA)

Caller: "I need to report a very serious computer crime! The local university
is running an illegal computer system!"

Me: "Could you please repeat that"

Caller: "The local university is running an illegal computer system! They've
hacked it!"

Me: "How could you tell they'd hacked it"

Caller: "Well, when it booted, it didn???t say Windows or Microsoft or
anything! It said something about Deviant Linux, I think, and the main
screen looked nothing like my good, legal Windows screen at home!
I think they hacked that, too!"

Me: "Do you mean Debian Linux"

Caller: "Yes, that! Is it some sort of computer mafia or something"

Me: "Uh, no, it's just a different operating system. Nothing to worry about."

Caller: "But it's illegal! It's not Microsoft, not even Windows! They're on a
normal Microsoft computer, so they're breaking the law! I think they stole
my identity when I came in the building! I'm calling the FBI!" *hangs up*

Fedora 12 launch at Singapore Polytechnic


Happy to have helped with the launch of Fedora 12 at the Singapore Polytechnic. It was a lunch and learn affair and we had about 120 or students in attendance – including about 10-20 faculty. Nice to see the interest. Good questions were asked: does it have AutoCad? How about PhotoShop? What about drivers? Was able to show them Fedora Electronics Lab and scribus and inkscape. Good interest and good feedback. Hopefully some will sign up as Fedora Ambassadors.

Acer Aspire One D250, Fedora and Android


My Mom was asking me for a small laptop for her to use and I figured that the best thing would be to get a netbook. With my sons and nephew in tow, we trooped down to VivoCity to see what’s on offer. Best Denki was the first stop and nothing that caught my eye. I had with me, my USB drive that runs F11 so I can test out the machines before I buy them. Better than using a live CD because not all the systems have CD drives.

Then we moved to Challenger and I was pleasantly surprised to see on offer the Acer Aspire One D250 preinstalled with Andriod and the some other OS version 7. I promptly, with a puzzled sales person overseeing me, plugged in my USB drive and booted the machine. Fedora 11 came up sprightly and the built-in camera, audio, wifi, bluetooth, 3 USB ports, ethernet and SD card reader all were detected and configured.

I did check out the set on display and the Android is a customized edition. The challenger sales person asked me if I wanted to “set up the machine”. I asked him why and he said that the Other OS is pre-loaded, but not configured. I said that doing a configuration would mean I have to agree to use that Other OS which I am not prepared to and that I am really interested in the Android and Fedora as the two OSes. He was not much of a help because “you are trying to run a freeware from your storage USB drive?”. I told him that, like Android, I am running another Linux distribution, called Fedora and that I would not need any other OS – especially the Other OS in the machine.

It appears that I can default the machine to boot from Android but I will first have to “set up” via the Other OS, which I might just do, so that I can get this machine to Mom.

Here are the specs of the machine (from lspci -vv):

00:00.0 Host bridge: Intel Corporation Mobile 945GME Express Memory Controller Hub (rev 03)
	Subsystem: Acer Incorporated [ALI] Device 022f
	Control: I/O- Mem+ BusMaster+ SpecCycle- MemWINV- VGASnoop- ParErr- Stepping- SERR- FastB2B- DisINTx-
	Status: Cap+ 66MHz- UDF- FastB2B+ ParErr- DEVSEL=fast TAbort- TAbort- MAbort+ SERR- PERR- INTx-
	Latency: 0
	Capabilities: access denied
	Kernel driver in use: agpgart-intel

00:02.0 VGA compatible controller: Intel Corporation Mobile 945GME Express Integrated Graphics Controller (rev 03) (prog-if 00 [VGA controller])
	Subsystem: Acer Incorporated [ALI] Device 022f
	Control: I/O+ Mem+ BusMaster+ SpecCycle- MemWINV- VGASnoop- ParErr- Stepping- SERR- FastB2B- DisINTx-
	Status: Cap+ 66MHz- UDF- FastB2B+ ParErr- DEVSEL=fast TAbort- TAbort- MAbort- SERR- PERR- INTx-
	Latency: 0
	Interrupt: pin A routed to IRQ 16
	Region 0: Memory at 58280000 (32-bit, non-prefetchable) [size=512K]
	Region 1: I/O ports at 60f0 [size=8]
	Region 2: Memory at 40000000 (32-bit, prefetchable) [size=256M]
	Region 3: Memory at 58300000 (32-bit, non-prefetchable) [size=256K]
	Expansion ROM at unassigned [disabled]
	Capabilities: access denied
	Kernel driver in use: i915
	Kernel modules: i915

00:02.1 Display controller: Intel Corporation Mobile 945GM/GMS/GME, 943/940GML Express Integrated Graphics Controller (rev 03)
	Subsystem: Acer Incorporated [ALI] Device 022f
	Control: I/O+ Mem+ BusMaster+ SpecCycle- MemWINV- VGASnoop- ParErr- Stepping- SERR- FastB2B- DisINTx-
	Status: Cap+ 66MHz- UDF- FastB2B+ ParErr- DEVSEL=fast TAbort- TAbort- MAbort- SERR- PERR- INTx-
	Latency: 0
	Region 0: Memory at 58200000 (32-bit, non-prefetchable) [size=512K]
	Capabilities: access denied

00:1b.0 Audio device: Intel Corporation 82801G (ICH7 Family) High Definition Audio Controller (rev 02)
	Subsystem: Acer Incorporated [ALI] Device 022f
	Control: I/O- Mem+ BusMaster+ SpecCycle- MemWINV- VGASnoop- ParErr- Stepping- SERR- FastB2B- DisINTx-
	Status: Cap+ 66MHz- UDF- FastB2B- ParErr- DEVSEL=fast TAbort- TAbort- MAbort- SERR- PERR- INTx-
	Latency: 0
	Interrupt: pin A routed to IRQ 16
	Region 0: Memory at 58340000 (64-bit, non-prefetchable) [size=16K]
	Capabilities: access denied
	Kernel driver in use: HDA Intel
	Kernel modules: snd-hda-intel

00:1c.0 PCI bridge: Intel Corporation 82801G (ICH7 Family) PCI Express Port 1 (rev 02) (prog-if 00 [Normal decode])
	Control: I/O+ Mem+ BusMaster+ SpecCycle- MemWINV- VGASnoop- ParErr- Stepping- SERR- FastB2B- DisINTx+
	Status: Cap+ 66MHz- UDF- FastB2B- ParErr- DEVSEL=fast TAbort- TAbort- MAbort- SERR- PERR- INTx-
	Latency: 0
	Bus: primary=00, secondary=01, subordinate=01, sec-latency=0
	I/O behind bridge: 00005000-00005fff
	Memory behind bridge: 57100000-581fffff
	Prefetchable memory behind bridge: 0000000050000000-0000000050ffffff
	Secondary status: 66MHz- FastB2B- ParErr- DEVSEL=fast TAbort- TAbort- MAbort- SERR- PERR-
	BridgeCtl: Parity- SERR- NoISA- VGA- MAbort- Reset- FastB2B-
		PriDiscTmr- SecDiscTmr- DiscTmrStat- DiscTmrSERREn-
	Capabilities: access denied
	Kernel driver in use: pcieport-driver

00:1c.1 PCI bridge: Intel Corporation 82801G (ICH7 Family) PCI Express Port 2 (rev 02) (prog-if 00 [Normal decode])
	Control: I/O+ Mem+ BusMaster+ SpecCycle- MemWINV- VGASnoop- ParErr- Stepping- SERR- FastB2B- DisINTx+
	Status: Cap+ 66MHz- UDF- FastB2B- ParErr- DEVSEL=fast TAbort- TAbort- MAbort- SERR- PERR- INTx-
	Latency: 0
	Bus: primary=00, secondary=02, subordinate=02, sec-latency=0
	I/O behind bridge: 00004000-00004fff
	Memory behind bridge: 56100000-570fffff
	Prefetchable memory behind bridge: 0000000051000000-0000000051ffffff
	Secondary status: 66MHz- FastB2B- ParErr- DEVSEL=fast TAbort- TAbort- MAbort- SERR- PERR-
	BridgeCtl: Parity- SERR- NoISA- VGA- MAbort- Reset- FastB2B-
		PriDiscTmr- SecDiscTmr- DiscTmrStat- DiscTmrSERREn-
	Capabilities: access denied
	Kernel driver in use: pcieport-driver

00:1c.2 PCI bridge: Intel Corporation 82801G (ICH7 Family) PCI Express Port 3 (rev 02) (prog-if 00 [Normal decode])
	Control: I/O+ Mem+ BusMaster+ SpecCycle- MemWINV- VGASnoop- ParErr- Stepping- SERR- FastB2B- DisINTx+
	Status: Cap+ 66MHz- UDF- FastB2B- ParErr- DEVSEL=fast TAbort- TAbort- MAbort- SERR- PERR- INTx-
	Latency: 0
	Bus: primary=00, secondary=03, subordinate=03, sec-latency=0
	I/O behind bridge: 00002000-00003fff
	Memory behind bridge: 55000000-560fffff
	Prefetchable memory behind bridge: 0000000052000000-0000000052ffffff
	Secondary status: 66MHz- FastB2B- ParErr- DEVSEL=fast TAbort- TAbort- MAbort- SERR- PERR-
	BridgeCtl: Parity- SERR- NoISA- VGA- MAbort- Reset- FastB2B-
		PriDiscTmr- SecDiscTmr- DiscTmrStat- DiscTmrSERREn-
	Capabilities: access denied
	Kernel driver in use: pcieport-driver

00:1c.3 PCI bridge: Intel Corporation 82801G (ICH7 Family) PCI Express Port 4 (rev 02) (prog-if 00 [Normal decode])
	Control: I/O+ Mem+ BusMaster+ SpecCycle- MemWINV- VGASnoop- ParErr- Stepping- SERR- FastB2B- DisINTx+
	Status: Cap+ 66MHz- UDF- FastB2B- ParErr- DEVSEL=fast TAbort- TAbort- MAbort- SERR- PERR- INTx-
	Latency: 0
	Bus: primary=00, secondary=04, subordinate=04, sec-latency=0
	I/O behind bridge: 00001000-00001fff
	Memory behind bridge: 54000000-54ffffff
	Prefetchable memory behind bridge: 0000000053000000-0000000053ffffff
	Secondary status: 66MHz- FastB2B- ParErr- DEVSEL=fast TAbort- TAbort- MAbort- SERR- PERR-
	BridgeCtl: Parity- SERR- NoISA- VGA- MAbort- Reset- FastB2B-
		PriDiscTmr- SecDiscTmr- DiscTmrStat- DiscTmrSERREn-
	Capabilities: access denied
	Kernel driver in use: pcieport-driver

00:1d.0 USB Controller: Intel Corporation 82801G (ICH7 Family) USB UHCI Controller #1 (rev 02) (prog-if 00 [UHCI])
	Subsystem: Acer Incorporated [ALI] Device 022f
	Control: I/O+ Mem- BusMaster+ SpecCycle- MemWINV- VGASnoop- ParErr- Stepping- SERR- FastB2B- DisINTx-
	Status: Cap- 66MHz- UDF- FastB2B+ ParErr- DEVSEL=medium TAbort- TAbort- MAbort- SERR- PERR- INTx-
	Latency: 0
	Interrupt: pin A routed to IRQ 16
	Region 4: I/O ports at 60a0 [size=32]
	Kernel driver in use: uhci_hcd

00:1d.1 USB Controller: Intel Corporation 82801G (ICH7 Family) USB UHCI Controller #2 (rev 02) (prog-if 00 [UHCI])
	Subsystem: Acer Incorporated [ALI] Device 022f
	Control: I/O+ Mem- BusMaster+ SpecCycle- MemWINV- VGASnoop- ParErr- Stepping- SERR- FastB2B- DisINTx-
	Status: Cap- 66MHz- UDF- FastB2B+ ParErr- DEVSEL=medium TAbort- TAbort- MAbort- SERR- PERR- INTx-
	Latency: 0
	Interrupt: pin B routed to IRQ 17
	Region 4: I/O ports at 6080 [size=32]
	Kernel driver in use: uhci_hcd

00:1d.2 USB Controller: Intel Corporation 82801G (ICH7 Family) USB UHCI Controller #3 (rev 02) (prog-if 00 [UHCI])
	Subsystem: Acer Incorporated [ALI] Device 022f
	Control: I/O+ Mem- BusMaster+ SpecCycle- MemWINV- VGASnoop- ParErr- Stepping- SERR- FastB2B- DisINTx-
	Status: Cap- 66MHz- UDF- FastB2B+ ParErr- DEVSEL=medium TAbort- TAbort- MAbort- SERR- PERR- INTx-
	Latency: 0
	Interrupt: pin C routed to IRQ 18
	Region 4: I/O ports at 6060 [size=32]
	Kernel driver in use: uhci_hcd

00:1d.3 USB Controller: Intel Corporation 82801G (ICH7 Family) USB UHCI Controller #4 (rev 02) (prog-if 00 [UHCI])
	Subsystem: Acer Incorporated [ALI] Device 022f
	Control: I/O+ Mem- BusMaster+ SpecCycle- MemWINV- VGASnoop- ParErr- Stepping- SERR- FastB2B- DisINTx-
	Status: Cap- 66MHz- UDF- FastB2B+ ParErr- DEVSEL=medium TAbort- TAbort- MAbort- SERR- PERR- INTx-
	Latency: 0
	Interrupt: pin D routed to IRQ 19
	Region 4: I/O ports at 6040 [size=32]
	Kernel driver in use: uhci_hcd

00:1d.7 USB Controller: Intel Corporation 82801G (ICH7 Family) USB2 EHCI Controller (rev 02) (prog-if 20 [EHCI])
	Subsystem: Acer Incorporated [ALI] Device 022f
	Control: I/O- Mem+ BusMaster+ SpecCycle- MemWINV- VGASnoop- ParErr- Stepping- SERR- FastB2B- DisINTx-
	Status: Cap+ 66MHz- UDF- FastB2B+ ParErr- DEVSEL=medium TAbort- TAbort- MAbort- SERR- PERR- INTx-
	Latency: 0
	Interrupt: pin A routed to IRQ 16
	Region 0: Memory at 58344400 (32-bit, non-prefetchable) [size=1K]
	Capabilities: access denied
	Kernel driver in use: ehci_hcd

00:1e.0 PCI bridge: Intel Corporation 82801 Mobile PCI Bridge (rev e2) (prog-if 01 [Subtractive decode])
	Control: I/O+ Mem+ BusMaster+ SpecCycle- MemWINV- VGASnoop- ParErr- Stepping- SERR- FastB2B- DisINTx-
	Status: Cap+ 66MHz- UDF- FastB2B- ParErr- DEVSEL=fast TAbort- TAbort- MAbort- SERR- PERR- INTx-
	Latency: 0
	Bus: primary=00, secondary=05, subordinate=05, sec-latency=32
	Secondary status: 66MHz- FastB2B+ ParErr- DEVSEL=medium TAbort- TAbort- MAbort+ SERR- PERR-
	BridgeCtl: Parity- SERR- NoISA- VGA- MAbort- Reset- FastB2B-
		PriDiscTmr- SecDiscTmr- DiscTmrStat- DiscTmrSERREn-
	Capabilities: access denied

00:1f.0 ISA bridge: Intel Corporation 82801GBM (ICH7-M) LPC Interface Bridge (rev 02)
	Subsystem: Acer Incorporated [ALI] Device 022f
	Control: I/O+ Mem+ BusMaster+ SpecCycle- MemWINV- VGASnoop- ParErr- Stepping- SERR- FastB2B- DisINTx-
	Status: Cap+ 66MHz- UDF- FastB2B- ParErr- DEVSEL=medium TAbort- TAbort- MAbort- SERR- PERR- INTx-
	Latency: 0
	Capabilities: access denied
	Kernel modules: iTCO_wdt, intel-rng

00:1f.2 SATA controller: Intel Corporation 82801GBM/GHM (ICH7 Family) SATA AHCI Controller (rev 02) (prog-if 01 [AHCI 1.0])
	Subsystem: Acer Incorporated [ALI] Device 022f
	Control: I/O+ Mem+ BusMaster+ SpecCycle- MemWINV- VGASnoop- ParErr- Stepping- SERR- FastB2B- DisINTx+
	Status: Cap+ 66MHz+ UDF- FastB2B+ ParErr- DEVSEL=medium TAbort- TAbort- MAbort- SERR- PERR- INTx-
	Latency: 0
	Interrupt: pin B routed to IRQ 28
	Region 0: I/O ports at 60d8 [size=8]
	Region 1: I/O ports at 60fc [size=4]
	Region 2: I/O ports at 60d0 [size=8]
	Region 3: I/O ports at 60f8 [size=4]
	Region 4: I/O ports at 6020 [size=16]
	Region 5: Memory at 58344000 (32-bit, non-prefetchable) [size=1K]
	Capabilities: access denied
	Kernel driver in use: ahci

00:1f.3 SMBus: Intel Corporation 82801G (ICH7 Family) SMBus Controller (rev 02)
	Subsystem: Acer Incorporated [ALI] Device 022f
	Control: I/O+ Mem- BusMaster- SpecCycle- MemWINV- VGASnoop- ParErr- Stepping- SERR- FastB2B- DisINTx-
	Status: Cap- 66MHz- UDF- FastB2B+ ParErr- DEVSEL=medium TAbort- TAbort- MAbort- SERR- PERR- INTx-
	Interrupt: pin B routed to IRQ 17
	Region 4: I/O ports at 6000 [size=32]
	Kernel driver in use: i801_smbus
	Kernel modules: i2c-i801

01:00.0 Network controller: Atheros Communications Inc. AR9285 Wireless Network Adapter (PCI-Express) (rev 01)
	Subsystem: Foxconn International, Inc. Device e016
	Physical Slot: 1
	Control: I/O+ Mem+ BusMaster+ SpecCycle- MemWINV- VGASnoop- ParErr- Stepping- SERR- FastB2B- DisINTx-
	Status: Cap+ 66MHz- UDF- FastB2B- ParErr- DEVSEL=fast TAbort- TAbort- MAbort- SERR- PERR- INTx-
	Latency: 0, Cache Line Size: 32 bytes
	Interrupt: pin A routed to IRQ 16
	Region 0: Memory at 57100000 (64-bit, non-prefetchable) [size=64K]
	Capabilities: access denied
	Kernel driver in use: ath9k
	Kernel modules: ath9k

03:00.0 Ethernet controller: Attansic Technology Corp. Device 1062 (rev c0)
	Subsystem: Acer Incorporated [ALI] Device 022f
	Control: I/O+ Mem+ BusMaster+ SpecCycle- MemWINV- VGASnoop- ParErr- Stepping- SERR- FastB2B- DisINTx+
	Status: Cap+ 66MHz- UDF- FastB2B- ParErr- DEVSEL=fast TAbort- TAbort- MAbort- SERR- PERR- INTx-
	Latency: 0
	Interrupt: pin A routed to IRQ 29
	Region 0: Memory at 55000000 (64-bit, non-prefetchable) [size=256K]
	Region 2: I/O ports at 2000 [size=128]
	Capabilities: access denied
	Kernel driver in use: atl1c
	Kernel modules: atl1c


This is the fdisk output:

fdisk -l

Disk /dev/sda: 250.0 GB, 250059350016 bytes
255 heads, 63 sectors/track, 30401 cylinders
Units = cylinders of 16065 * 512 = 8225280 bytes
Disk identifier: 0x7529554a

   Device Boot      Start         End      Blocks   Id  System
/dev/sda1               1        1567    12586896   27  Unknown
/dev/sda2            1568        2090     4200997+   c  W95 FAT32 (LBA)
/dev/sda3   *        2091        2103      104422+   7  HPFS/NTFS
/dev/sda4            2104       30401   227303685    f  W95 Ext'd (LBA)
/dev/sda5            2104       30401   227303653+   7  HPFS/NTFS

The Android partition is /dev/sda2. I have backed up each partition and kept them as a tgz file. The android partition is about 1.3G uncompressed.

I think my next task is to file for a Other OS refund. Looking forward to the fun.

F9->F10 preupgrade


I spent some time over the weekend upgrading my son’s F9 machine to F10 and chose the PreUpgrade path. It all went well and when I finally logged into the F10 environment, Firefox refused to run saying that it “Couldn’t load XPCOM”. Did a search for similar reports and all of them, unfortunately, were rather sparse in information. I decided to do the following:
a) rpm -e firefox
b) yum search mozilla

The search yielded some clues – xulrunner among others. So, the following was done:
c) yum -y reinstall xulrunner*
d) yum install firefox

and when it was all said and done, ff fired up happily!

Cambridge is out now! Fire It UP!


Congratulations to all on the successful launch of Fedora 10 Cambridge. There are many features and functions in it that the tight six-month release cycle promises to help evolve and mature. This is NOT a revenue event. It never is and never will be. It is an event that continues the symbolize the true value of collaboration and the mantra of release early, release often. When you are not shackled by business goals and featuritis NIHism, you cannot but see the wonderful development model FOSS is. The transition from Fedora (or any other JBoss.org project for that matter) into enterprise ready usage is another matter – a process that takes on a longer supportability timeline as well as deeper accountability and business survivabilty of the user. That type of transition has been mastered (and continues to be refined) by the Red Hat Enterprise Linux, JBoss, Red Hat Network, Red Hat MRG (Messaging, Realtime and Grid), and the Qumranet product lines.

There is no vendor lock-in, no NIHisms, no need for secrecy, no back doors, no special sause, no undocumented formats. Just pure sharing, collaboration and rampant innovation.

How can the world be run in any other way?

read more | digg story

Adding fonts in F9


My son has been asking me to install a bunch of fonts so that he can use them to create interesting stuff for online games he plays like those from pawntactics.com and runescape.com. He has a Fedora 9 machine and the challenge I have is how does he, as normal user, add fonts. I cannot seem to find a way to do so. I have looked at gnome-appearance-properties and gnome-control-center (which will invoke gnome-appearance-properties) and the “fonts” tab does not have a “Add Font” button. Perhaps a missing feature?

In any case, for the record, what I had to do is to get the fonts that he wanted to use and placed them directly into /usr/share/fonts. They are immediately available to any application (he’s using Gimp and OpenOffice.org).

UPDATE: filed a bugzilla and am downloading the source to control-center from http://download.fedora.redhat.com/pub/fedora/linux/updates/9/SRPMS.newkey/ to see if I can cut some code to fix this.